Troubleshooting Questions

In most cases, yes, you can fix it. Since this is a longer answer, click here to match your issue with a solution.

Low-sweetener jam or jelly that is a bright color at first will begin to fade over time and with exposure to light. This is a process of color loss and does not mean the jam or jelly is going bad. The browning starts at the top of the jar and slowly works its way down. If your jars were properly sealed and the seal is still intact, the jam or jelly, although not as pretty as it once was, is safe to eat.

To slow down the process of color loss, store your sealed jars in total darkness. You can also add some lemon juice even when a recipe does not require it (1 tablespoon per cup of mashed fruit or juice at the most). Freezing your fruit and then making the jam or jelly closer to the time when you are going to eat it or give it away is also recommended.

Using citric acid powder instead of lemon juice can be more effective at preventing color loss/color change. One-quarter teaspoon powdered Citric Acid is equivalent to 1 Tablespoon lemon juice. 1 teaspoon powdered Citric Acid is equivalent to ¼ cup lemon juice (4 Tablespoons). Citric Acid lowers pH (makes the mixture more acid as does lemon juice) and imparts tartness to the fruit mixture (as does lemon juice), but it doesn’t add a particular flavor.

If your jam or jelly is too thick, the first question to ask is: Is it spreadable? The Pomona’s jell could be stiffer or firmer than you are used to, but it should be spreadable. If it’s not spreadable, then something went wrong.

The most usual cause for a too firm or rubbery texture with Pomona’s is that you used less fruit than the recipe called for. Our recipes are calculated for mashed fruit. So if you use pieces of fruit or whole berries, you are actually using less fruit than if it were mashed, or cooked to a mash and then measured, and you will get a firmer jell. Or you may have used more pectin than the recipe called for. For example, if you used Tablespoons of pectin rather than teaspoons.

Cooking can also affect the amount of fruit you are working with. For example, if you cook the fruit mixture for too long before adding pectin, you could reduce the fruit volume and make the pectin amount too high for the fruit you have left.

It is less likely that your jam would be too firm from overcooking after adding the pectin. Usually if you cook jam made with Pomona’s for too long after adding the pectin, it will de-activate the pectin and you will get a poor jell.

All of this being said, the typical Pomona’s jell is more like a fruit spread than a gloppy high-sugar jam. If you prefer a softer set, you can always use less pectin than called for in our recipes. We would suggest you experiment by using ¼ to ½ teaspoon less pectin than the recipe calls for, or perhaps up to a teaspoon less for recipes that call for 4 teaspoons of pectin. You would keep the calcium water amount the same.

Yes. Pomona’s Pectin will start breaking down if it is subjected to extended cooking. After you have added the pectin to your boiling fruit mixture, you can continue to cook for up to 10 minutes without harming the pectin. After 10 minutes you risk breaking down the pectin.

An extended boiling water-bath of the filled jars also risks breaking down the pectin. The pectin is likely to be totally broken down by pressure canning. If you follow the cooking times in the directions and recipes that come with Pomona’s, the pectin will retain its full jelling power.

For an immediate fix, gently stir some additional sweetener into the jar.

Another option is to empty the jar into a small saucepan. Add the sweetener you want to the mixture in the pan and bring to a boil, stirring well for 1 minute. Put the hot mixture into a clean, hot jar and put on a washed lid. Eat when thoroughly cool and the mixture has re-jelled.

If you want to fix a whole batch at once, pour the contents of all the jars into a pan – remove lids carefully if they haven’t been on the jars for very long and you want to re-use them. Add more sweetener. Bring the mixture to a good boil. Boil and stir for 2 minutes. Jar and process according to the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

Usually that thin, white film is jelled foam. If your fruit was foamy in the sauce pan and you didn’t skim the foam off, or if your mixture had a lot of air in it and you didn’t do air releasing before putting the jam in the jars, the foam or tiny air bubbles rise to the top of the jar and form that white film.

It is always a good idea to inspect a jar of jam that has been stored on the shelf before eating it. Do you see mold? Does the jam smell moldy or fermented (have a smell of alcohol)? If yes, throw it away. If not, taste it and if it tastes okay, it is fine to eat it.

Cloudy jelly is usually due to improper juicing of the fruit. Fruit should be cooked gently rather than boiled. Dripping should happen through a fine mesh jelly bag or layers of cheesecloth. Never squeeze the jelly bag or cheesecloth. High-sugar jelly tends to have a very crystal clear look from the fact that there is more sugar than juice in the jar. The high level of melted sugar in the jelly creates that look. You may be able to obtain very clear low-sugar jelly by straining the properly obtained juice a number of times.

What you have is called “fruit float.” When the jars of jam are very hot and there is no jell yet, the pulp, which is lighter than the juice, is able to float to the top of the jar. Strawberries are prone to fruit float although it doesn’t always happen. Other fruits can have fruit float also. You are not doing anything wrong. However, if you want to discourage fruit float from happening, you can mash your fruit a little more and you can cook your fruit for a little while before you bring it up to the full boil. You could even add a little of your sweetener to cook with the fruit, still leaving enough sweetener to adequately disburse the pectin powder without going over the sweetener limit.

In the future, when you take the jars out of the water bath, leave them for about an hour to start cooling and seal. Then come back and check to make sure they are all sealed. If you see that you have fruit float, turn the jars upside down to force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Come back in about 45 minutes and turn the jars right side up to once again force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Check again in another 45 minutes and if you have a distinct dividing line, turn the jars upside down again. Turn the jars right side up again in about 30 minutes. You always want the jars to end up right side up. By keeping the pulp well distributed throughout the jars, there will not be a dividing line when the jell finally starts and locks everything into place.

If your jam has jelled in a separated state, you can gently stir the pulp and juice back together when you open the jar to eat it. Separated jam in sealed jars will store safely.

There are several scenarios that can cause the pectin to clump together when it is added to the fruit mixture.

  1. The pectin was stirred directly into the fruit mixture.
  2. The pectin was stirred into an amount of sweetener below the low end of the sweetener range.
  3. The pectin was not well mixed throughout the sweetener.
  4. The pectin was stirred into a sugar with larger crystals, like turbinado sugar. The pectin may not mix well with these larger crystals.

The Fix: Turn off the heat and fish out the pectin clumps as much as you can. Put ¾ cup up to 1 cup of hot fruit mixture into a cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add the pectin clumps that you fished out. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for a full minute until all clumps are totally dissolved.

Bring pan with fruit mixture back to a boil, add blended pectin-fruit, and stir well. Stir vigorously to break up any pectin clumps still in the fruit mixture. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Remove from the heat. Jar and process according to the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

Note: For this fix to work, your fruit mixture needs to be a “low-sweetener mixture” — that is, the sweetener that is already mixed in with the fruit has to be within the sweetener ranges on our recipe sheet. The pectin clumps can only fully dissolve in a low-sweetener mixture.

If the sweetener in your mixture is above the sweetener range, turn off the heat and fish out the pectin clumps as much as you can. Put ¾ cup up to 1 cup of boiling water or boiling unsweetened fruit juice into a cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add the pectin clumps that you fished out. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for a full minute until all clumps are totally dissolved.

Bring pan with fruit mixture back to a boil, add blended pectin, and stir well. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Remove from the heat. Jar and process according to the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

If you stir the pectin powder into an amount of sweetener that is beyond the range shown in our recipes, or have too much sweetener already added to the fruit, the pectin powder will be inhibited from dissolving and may go grainy. Pomona’s Pectin can only properly dissolve in a low-sugar environment, so it is necessary to keep the sweetener low (within our range) while you are dissolving the pectin in the boiling fruit mixture. Additional sweetener can be added after the pectin is fully dissolved.

When the pectin becomes grainy from being stirred into a higher-sweetener mixture, you can’t get rid of the graininess by more cooking. The fix is to add enough more mashed fruit or unsweetened juice to bring the sugar or honey level down to within the original recipe’s sweetener range. This allows the grainy pectin to dissolve and do its job of jelling the original amount of mashed fruit or juice.

You will also add pectin, calcium water, and lemon or lime juice (if called for in the recipe) for the additional mashed fruit or juice. You will add the pectin by making liquid pectin using an immersion blender, food processor, or blender. You can make the liquid pectin with boiling water or boiling unsweetened fruit juice.

First determine:

  1. How much additional mashed fruit for jam or juice for jelly do you need to add to bring the sugar or honey level down to within the original recipe’s sweetener range? See example below.
  2. Using the original recipe, how much pectin will you need to jell this additional fruit or juice?
  3. Using the original recipe, how much calcium water will you need for the additional fruit or juice?
  4. Using the original recipe, how much lemon (or lime) juice will you need for the additional fruit or juice?

Example: If you made jelly with 4 cups of blackberry juice and stirred the pectin into 3 cups of sugar (2 cups is the sugar limit for 4 cups of juice), then you will have to add 2 cups of unsweetened juice to bring the sugar level to within the low-sugar range (3 cups of sugar is the limit for 6 cups of juice). You will also add 2 teaspoons calcium water and 2 Tablespoons lemon juice for the additional 2 cups of blackberry juice. Then you will make liquid pectin with ½ cup boiling liquid and 2 teaspoons pectin.

Use the table below to figure out how much water or unsweetened juice is required to dissolve the additional pectin.

Pectin to Add  :  Amount of Boiling Liquid
Up to 3 teaspoons  :  ½ cup liquid
4 to 4 ¾ teaspoons  :  ¾ cup liquid
5 to 6 teaspoons  :  1 cup liquid
7 teaspoons  :  1 ¼ cups liquid
8 teaspoons  :  1 1/3 cups liquid

Make liquid pectin by measuring the correct amount of water or unsweetened fruit juice into a small sauce pan and bring to a boil. Put boiling liquid in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

Fix Your Jam/Jelly: Empty jars into sauce pan. Add additional fruit for jam or juice for jelly. Add additional calcium water. Add additional lemon juice (if called for in the recipe). Stir well. Bring mixture to a full boil. Add liquid pectin and stir well. If you want to add more sweetener, do that now and stir well to dissolve. When mixture returns to a full boil, remove from the heat. Jar and process according to the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

Usually there is nothing you can do or need to do because it doesn’t cause serious problems. The jam or jelly is still safe to eat. You might notice that your jam or jelly is weepy (liquid seeps out of the jell and forms a puddle) or that the jell is stiffer than normal. It’s also possible you could experience a more acid taste.

Some fruits have calcium in them naturally. This natural calcium will activate the pectin. Wait until the next day to see if your mixture jells when thoroughly cool. If it has gelled, you don’t need to do anything.

If it hasn’t gelled, open the jars and put the mixture into a sauce pan. (If you made the jam or jelly recently and you carefully remove the lids without damaging them, you can re-use the same lids.) Add the missing calcium water and stir well. Bring the mixture to a good boil. Boil and stir for 2 minutes. Jar and process according to the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

If your recipe called for lemon juice and you forgot to put it in, your mixture will not be acid enough for safe canning. You have to open the jars and put the mixture into a sauce pan. (If you made the jam or jelly recently and you carefully remove the lids without damaging them, you can re-use the same lids.) Add the missing lemon juice and stir well. Bring the mixture to a good boil. Boil and stir for 2 minutes. Jar and process according to the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

There are several things that can prevent a jar from sealing:

1. Headspace too big or too small (headspace should be ¼ inch)
2. A chip on the jar rim
3. Using an old lid (new lids must be used)
4. Screwing the band on too tightly (band should be fingertip tight)
5. Jam on the jar rim (rims should be wiped clean)

Click here for our Step-by-Step Tutorial on Water Bath Canning.

How to Use Pomona's Pectin

The shelf life for cooked and processed jam made with Pomona’s is one year. Once opened, cooked and processed jam lasts 3 weeks in the refrigerator.

Pomona’s Pectin is activated by calcium, so calcium has to be present in the mixture either naturally or added by you. Since most people don’t know the calcium content of their fruit, we recommend a calcium water amount in every recipe to be sure there is calcium in the mixture. If your fruit has calcium in it naturally, you don’t need to add the calcium water.

Yes, if you want to make a small batch, our jam and jelly recipes can always be halved or quartered. Be sure to halve or quarter all of the ingredients in the recipe.

Yes, you can double or triple a Pomona’s cooked recipe. Be sure to double or triple all of the ingredients in the recipe.

Potential Limits and Pitfalls when doubling or tripling a recipe:

  1. You must have a water-bath canner that is large enough to hold ALL of the jars you are filling. It is not safe canning practice to let some of the filled jars sit on the counter while you water bath others. As soon as all the jars are filled and have their lids on, they should ALL go into the boiling water in the canner.
  2. You must have a pot that is large enough to hold all of the fruit in the recipe plus the added ingredients, with enough extra room to stir vigorously while the mixture is boiling and not have the contents spill over.
  3. You must have a stove that is powerful enough to bring the fruit mixture to a full boil and to bring it back to a full boil in a few minutes after you stir in the pectin-sweetener mix. If the fruit mixture with the pectin in it takes too long to return to a full boil, the pectin can be de-activated and you will get runny jam.
  4. You must have a stove that is powerful enough to bring a large water bath canner with all of the filled jars in it back to a rolling boil in a few minutes so as not to de-activate the pectin by extended exposure to heat while waiting for the boil to come back.

We do not recommend quadrupling a recipe unless you are specifically set up for it.

The small asterisks that appear by some fruits and then appear again in the measured ingredients column of that recipe (next to ¼ cup lemon or lime juice) are telling you that the fruits with the asterisk, like Sweet Blackberry, require the ¼ cup lemon or lime juice. The addition of lemon or lime juice is required for canning safety, and sometimes for jelling.

Generally we recommend½ pint (8 oz or 1 cup) jars for low-sugar jams and jellies. The ¼ pint (4 oz or ½ cup) are a good size also if you’re making the jam or jelly for gifts.

You can use 1 pint (2 cup) jars but it’s important to remember that a jar of low-sugar jam or jelly will last only about 3 weeks in the refrigerator once opened. So unless you and your family can eat 2 cups of jam in 3 weeks, it’s better to use the smaller jars.

The processing time for all three jar sizes of jam or jelly is the same.

We recommend that you read and understand the directions and recipes that come with Pomona’s Universal Pectin before you start jamming. Pomona’s is different from other pectins because it is not pre-mixed with dextrose. This means that the pectin powder is more potent and it also means you cannot add the pectin powder directly to the fruit or the pectin will clump. If you plan to develop your own recipes, it is important to follow the appropriate directions for how much pectin to use and for how to add the pectin to the fruit.

Ingredients Questions

The table below gives you the minimum amount of sweetener required for adequate disbursement of the pectin:

Pectin to add:                      Minimum amount of sweetener required:

1 teaspoon (or less)                2 Tablespoons sugar or honey
2 teaspoons                            ¼ cup sugar or honey
3 teaspoons                             3/8 cup sugar or honey
4 teaspoons                             ½ cup sugar or honey
5 teaspoons                            5/8 cup sugar or honey
6 teaspoons                             ¾ cup sugar or honey
7 or 8 teaspoons                      1 cup sugar or honey

Yes. You can bring the water or juice to a boil, put it in a canning jar and add the needed pectin powder. Screw on the lid, pick up the jar with a hot pad and shake well to get the pectin saturated with liquid. Shake the jar every so often while the liquid is still hot. When the liquid cools down, put the jar in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning you should find fully dissolved liquid pectin (no pectin clumps whatsoever).

*We don’t recommend making jam or jelly with absolutely no sweetener. The final product is likely to be tart and bland. Sweetener, even in a small amount, brings out the flavor of the fruit.

If you want to try it, however, this is what you do: For 4 cups of mashed fruit or juice, use either ½ cup water or unsweetened fruit juice (if you’re using 2 or 3 teaspoons of pectin) or ¾ cup water or unsweetened fruit juice (if you’re using 4 teaspoons of pectin).

Make liquid pectin by measuring the correct amount of water or juice into a small sauce pan and bringing it to a boil. Put boiling liquid in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

Add the liquid pectin to the boiling fruit or juice mixture, which should already contain the calcium water and lemon juice (or lime juice or vinegar) if called for in the recipe. Stir while mixture returns to a full boil. If you taste your jam before jarring and it isn’t sweet enough, you can add however much sweetener you want at this point. Stir well and return mixture to a boil, remove from heat, jar and process according to the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

These instructions are also on the recipe sheet that comes with your box of Pomona’s Pectin.

Yes. Put 4 cups of unsweetened white grape juice or unsweetened apple juice in a sauce pan and boil down to 1 cup. You will then have the equivalent of 1 cup of no-sugar-added frozen juice concentrate that you buy in the grocery store.

Yes, you can use unsweetened juice as the “sweetener,” but unsweetened juice does not have the sweetening power that juice concentrate has and can’t be classified as a sweetener for jam & jelly.

Yes, sorghum can be used just like honey.

Yes. Truvia and similar sweeteners can be used in all of our recipes. ½ cup Truvia Baking Blend is equal in sweetness to 1 cup of sugar. So when a recipe calls for a certain amount of sugar, you would use half that amount. For recipes that give a sugar range, pick the amount of sugar you would want to use and then cut it in half for the Truvia Baking Blend.

Truvia Spoonable says that 3/4 teaspoon is equivalent to 2 teaspoons sugar, so if you are using that product, you could use slightly less than half the amount of sugar you would use, or go with half to make it easier and it should be just fine.

You need to stir the pectin into a minimum amount of sugar or Truvia in order for the pectin to get dispersed adequately. The table below gives you the minimum amounts:

 

Pectin to add                      Minimum amount of sweetener required

1 teaspoon (or less)               2 Tablespoons sugar or honey

2 teaspoons                            ¼ cup sugar or honey

3 teaspoons                             3/8 cup sugar or honey

4 teaspoons                             ½ cup sugar or honey

5 teaspoons                            5/8 cup sugar or honey

6 teaspoons                             ¾ cup sugar or honey

7 or 8 teaspoons                      1 cup sugar or honey

When using concentrated stevia as the sweetener in a cooked recipe, you get the pectin to dissolve properly by making liquid pectin with boiling water or unsweetened fruit juice. Follow the directions and recipes for Cooked Jam & Jelly – Low Sugar or Honey on the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin. You won’t be able to stir the pectin into the sweetener. Instead, follow instructions for making liquid pectin and adding it to the fruit mixture.

When using concentrated stevia to add more sweetness to a jam or jelly sweetened with juice concentrate, add stevia to taste after you add the blended mixture of juice concentrate and pectin to the boiling fruit or juice in the pan.

Yes, Stevia that measures like sugar (cup for cup Stevia) can be used just like sugar in all of our recipes.

Yes you can, but because the pectin won’t mix well with the larger crystals and is therefore more likely to clump when the sugar-pectin is added to the boiling fruit or juice. To avoid clumping, you need to granulate these sugars in a food processor or blender before measuring out the amount you want.

Yes, agave can be used just like honey.

Yes.

Yes, you can substitute honey for sugar or sugar for honey in a Pomona’s Pectin recipe written specifically for one or the other. Honey is sweeter than sugar, so you use less of it when substituting for sugar. Conversely, when substituting sugar for honey, you will use more sugar to achieve the same sweetness. See equivalency table below.

Sugar-Honey Equivalency Table

Note: This is a “more or less” equivalency

  • ½ cup sugar = ¼ cup honey (or other liquid sweetener like agave or maple syrup)
  • ¾ cup sugar = 1/3 cup honey (or other liquid sweetener like agave or maple syrup)
  • 1 cup sugar = ½ cup honey (or other liquid sweetener like agave or maple syrup)
  • 1½ cups sugar = ¾ cup honey (or other liquid sweetener like agave or maple syrup)
  • 2 cups sugar = 1 cup honey (or other liquid sweetener like agave or maple syrup)

In the Pomona’s Cooked Recipes – Low Sugar or Honey, it is essential to stir the pectin into an amount of sweetener in the range given in the recipe because the pectin will only dissolve in a low-sugar mixture. Any additional sweetener should be held aside until after you have added the pectin-sweetener mix to the boiling fruit and stirred vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to get the pectin dissolved. Once the pectin is dissolved, you are free to add extra sweetener above the range. Stir in the extra sweetener well and bring the mixture back to a full boil before turning off the heat.

Be aware that adding extra liquid sweetener can soften the jell, so consider adding a little extra pectin in Step 4 if you will be adding extra liquid sweetener.

Yes. Our general guideline for adding alcohol to a Pomona’s Pectin recipe for jam or jelly (or fruit sauce or syrup) is to add ¼ cup alcohol per 4 cups mashed fruit or juice AND to reduce the amount of mashed fruit or juice by ¼ cup.

For example, if you are making Peach Jam with 4 cups of mashed peach and you want to add some alcohol, that translates to ¼ cup alcohol and 3 3/4 cups mashed peach. This amount of alcohol should give you the flavor without affecting the consistency or the canning safety of the recipe.

Yes, but the vinegar must be standardized to 5% acidity and it likely will have some effect on the taste.

Citric Acid can be substituted – it will adjust the acidity (lower the pH) of the fruit, which is what you want to do. ¼ teaspoon powdered Citric Acid is equivalent to 1 Tablespoon lemon juice. 1 teaspoon powdered Citric Acid is equivalent to ¼ cup lemon juice (4 Tablespoons). Citric Acid lowers pH and imparts tartness to the fruit mixture, but it doesn’t add a particular flavor.

Ascorbic Acid cannot be substituted for lemon or lime juice or vinegar in a Pomona’s recipe. It is simply Vitamin C powder. It will not lower the pH of the fruit. It is commonly used to prevent browning in cut fresh fruit or fruit that will be canned.

Citric Acid and Ascorbic Acid are two different acids, with different chemical compositions. Both are present in lemon juice.

Yes, for safe water bath canning it’s important to add the lemon or lime juice or vinegar if called for in a Pomona’s Pectin recipe. In some cases, the added acid may be also be required for the jam or jelly to jell properly with Pomona’s

To be safe for water bath canning, the fruit mixture must be what is considered “high acid,” which means the pH must be 4.6 or below. Many fruits are high acid naturally. But fruits that are considered to be “lower acid” and/or fruits and vegetables that are considered to be “low acid,” need lemon or lime juice or vinegar added to bring down their pH into the “safe for water bath canning” range.

If you are converting a recipe or developing your own, go to Get Creative for information about which fruits require additional acid with Pomona’s Pectin and the amount required for each fruit.

You can make a jam that is a mix of different fruits by referring to the basic recipes on the recipe sheet that comes with the pectin or to the instructions on the Get Creative page on this website, and then doing the math. You will use the amounts of lemon or lime juice (if called for), calcium water, and pectin appropriate for each cup of mashed fruit you will be jamming.

Yes, you can use canned fruit for the cooked recipes as long as no sweetener has been added to the fruit.

Yes, you can use frozen fruit for the cooked recipes. It’s best to use unsweetened frozen fruit. Defrost, but don’t drain, frozen fruit before using. Generally you use the liquid from the frozen fruit along with the fruit unless you notice that there is an excessive amount of liquid, in which case you would ladle off some of the excess liquid before measuring your mashed fruit. If you are going to juice the fruit for jelly, then you would use all of the liquid.

Pectin and Calcium Questions

Stored in the refrigerator, calcium water will last many months. It can be frozen for even longer storage. When you take your jar out of the refrigerator, look at it before shaking it. You should see white powder settled at the bottom and floating near the bottom of the jar, with clear water above that. If you see any colors or mold in the jar, discard the calcium water. Always shake well before using.

The monocalcium phosphate powder that comes in its own packet when you purchase Pomona’s is a food-grade rock mineral source of calcium made up of two minerals, calcium and phosphorous. The food industry uses it as a yeast nutrient in baking, an acidulant in baking powder, and a mineral supplement.

Because the pectin is activated by calcium.

Pomona’s Universal Pectin is a shelf-stable product. It keeps indefinitely. Store it cool and dry in an airtight container.

One teaspoon (3 grams) of Pomona’s Universal Pectin contains:

  • 10.2 Total Calories
  • 2.55 grams carbohydrate (from soluble fiber)
  • 2.5 grams soluble fiber
  • 90 mg sodium

One tablespoon of an average jam made with Pomona’s Pectin contains:

  • 1.9 calories from the pectin
  • 480mg carbohydrate from the pectin
  • 470mg soluble fiber from the pectin
  • 17mg sodium from the pectin

These numbers do not account for the fruit, sweetener, or any other ingredients in your jam.

The calcium water is calcium, phosphorus, and water — no calories, protein, carbohydrate, sugar, fat, or sodium.

The pectin that is used for Pomona's Universal Pectin is Kosher certified at the facility where it is manufactured in Italy. However, once it reaches our packaging facility in the USA, we do not have the pectin Kosher certified when we re-package it into smaller quantities.

Pomona’s Universal Pectin is vegan, gluten free, and GMO free. Pomona’s Pectin is not organic. There is no commercially available organic pectin at this time.

Pomona’s Universal Pectin contains only 100% pure citrus pectin, which is vegan, gluten free, and GMO free. There are no additives, preservatives, sugar, or dextrose. There are no corn or apple by-products.

Italy.

Pectin is a naturally occuring substance (a polyscaccaride) found in various fruits. Pomona’s Universal Pectin is 100% citrus pectin and is extracted from the dried peel of lemon, lime, and orange, after the fruit has been juiced and the oil has been pressed out of the peel.

Call our JAMLINE

Still having trouble or questions? Pomona’s Pectin operates a JAMLINE. A real person is available to answer questions and hear comments. The number is 559-760-0910. JAMLINE hours are Mon-Fri, 8am-4pm CST. If we don’t answer, please leave a message and we will return your call as soon as possible.

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