open jar of strawberry jam next to fresh strawberries

Strawberry Jam

 

Strawberry Jam is an early summer classic treat with bursts of tart and sweet. Feel free to use other sweeteners that measure like sugar or honey in this recipe. For example, you can use Stevia in the Raw or another Stevia product that measures like sugar, or Splenda that measures like sugar. You can also use a different liquid sweetener, like agave or maple syrup. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Notes

If you’re not sure if your jam is sweet enough, taste it after the pectin is dissolved and jam has come back up to a boil. Not sweet enough? Add more sweetener and stir 1 minute at full boil.
Servings 5 cups

Ingredients

  • 4 cups mashed strawberries about 8 cups whole strawberries
  • 2 teaspoons calcium water see step #1
  • ½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin mixed with sweetener

Instructions

  • Before you begin, prepare calcium water.
    To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well.
    Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.
  • Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a simmer. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.
  • Wash, remove hulls, and mash strawberries. Measure fruit into sauce pan.
  • Add calcium water and mix well.
  • Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.
  • Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.
  • Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

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26 Responses

  1. Kristi
    | Reply

    Hello,
    I noticed that your strawberry jam recipe and your rhubarb jam recipe both DO Not have lemon juice in them but your strawberry rhubarb jam does. I assume both the strawberries and the rhubarb are acidic enough to can on their own safety so can I leave the lemon juice out of the strawberry rhubarb jam? I can’t have citrus (migraine trigger). Thank you.

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hello Kristi,

      That is a great question and a great catch! Yes, the lemon juice would not be necessary for the Strawberry Rhubarb Jam. We did want to mention that Pomona’s Pectin is a citrus pectin, just in case that will effect you as well. 😊

      Happy jamming!

      Kindly,
      Shelby

  2. Kate
    | Reply

    Hello!
    Is this recipe meant to be canned in half-pint jars? I couldn’t find the jar size in the recipe.
    Thank you,
    Kate

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hello Kate,

      We recommend that all of our recipe be canned in 4oz or 8oz jars.

      Happy jamming!

  3. Dana Dacres
    | Reply

    Shouldn’t there be lemon juice somewhere in this recipe for safe canning…? I’m new to this realm, forgive

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hello Dana,

      Not in this one. Strawberries have a safe pH for canning.

      Happy jamming!

  4. Jami O'Bryant
    | Reply

    Can monk fruit be used in place of sweetener in this recipe?

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hello Jami,
      It sure. can be! We would recommend starting with 3/4 cup and then adding additional, should you deem it needs more, after the pectin/sweetener is dissolved, just before you can you jam.

  5. Patty Fisher
    | Reply

    Do I stir the fruit mixture while bringing it to the first boil?

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hello Patty,

      Yes, you can stir it gently, over stirring can cause foaming.

      Happy jamming!

  6. Kristen
    | Reply

    I’d like to see the ingredients by weight if possible.

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hi Kristen,

      Thanks so much for choosing Pomona’s Pectin! We are working on getting that feature on our website, so sorry it is not available yet.

  7. HL Parsons
    | Reply

    Is it possible to modify this recipe for freezer jam (no-cook)?

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Absolutely! You can find those directions, HERE.

      Happy jamming!

      • Sheri
        | Reply

        Can leftover jam be eaten?

        • Shelby Collings
          | Reply

          Absolutely! It can be placed in a container and store in the fridge for up to 3 weeks. Enjoy 😊

  8. Lee K. Portland OR
    | Reply

    Made this jam yesterday with our local Hood strawberries. Delicious! But oh my the foaming was pretty bad. It also looked like it is separated in the jars. I wonder if using a stick blender after taking it off the heat would help, or just aerate it too much…

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Wonderful!

      Strawberries are the worst culprits for foaming! No fun. You can try mashing them up more fine, and making sure they do not boil too high, for very long. Just enough to get the honey/pectin to dissolve.

      What you have is called “fruit float.” When the jars of jam are very hot and there is no jell yet, the pulp, which is lighter than the juice, is able to float to the top of the jar. Strawberries are prone to fruit float although it doesn’t always happen. Other fruits can have fruit float also. You are not doing anything wrong. However, if you want to discourage fruit float from happening, you can mash your fruit a little more and you can cook your fruit for a little while before you bring it up to the full boil. You could even add a little of your sweetener to cook with the fruit, still leaving enough sweetener to adequately disburse the pectin powder without going over the sweetener limit.

      In the future, when you take the jars out of the water bath, leave them for about an hour to start cooling and seal. Then come back and check to make sure they are all sealed. If you see that you have fruit float, turn the jars upside down to force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Come back in about 45 minutes and turn the jars right side up to once again force the pulp to redistribute through the jar. Check again in another 45 minutes and if you have a distinct dividing line, turn the jars upside down again. Turn the jars right side up again in about 30 minutes. You always want the jars to end up right side up. By keeping the pulp well distributed throughout the jars, there will not be a dividing line when the jell finally starts and locks everything into place.

      If your jam has jelled in a separated state, you can gently stir the pulp and juice back together when you open the jar to eat it. Separated jam in sealed jars will store safely.

    • Jami O'Bryant
      | Reply

      you can add a little pad of butter – helps great with foam!

  9. JoAnne
    | Reply

    Preparing to do another batch of strawberries with Pomonas. Love this pectin! I use it for all my jams & jellies. Easy, uses 1/2 the sugar of recipes, and comes out tasty!

    • Kelli
      | Reply

      Can you can in pint jars? My kids go through it so fast the half pints seem a waste of lids.

      • Shelby Collings
        | Reply

        If it is consumed with in the 1-3 weeks, you sure can!

  10. Maki
    | Reply

    Can you use the instant pot for this?

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      We do not suggest using an instant pot for jamming with Pomona’s Pectin.

    • Emily
      | Reply

      Having issues with foaming. I know regular pectin says butter can help. Can I do that with this pectin?

      • Shelby Collings
        | Reply

        Hello Emily, strawberries are common culprits! Yes, 1/4 tsp butter can help reduce foaming. It is also helpful to cook them as little as possible.
        Happy jamming!

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