bowl of yogurt mixed with berry jam on a plate

Yogurt – Thickening Homemade Yogurt with Pomona’s Pectin

 

Yes, Pomona’s Pectin can be used to help thicken homemade yogurt!

Notes

We are not yogurt makers and cannot give you advice on making the yogurt – that being said... if you are a yogurt maker and trying to thicken your homemade yogurt, consider giving this method a try.

Instructions

  • How to Thicken Homemade Yogurt with Pomona's Pectin:
  • Using the calcium powder that comes with Pomona's Pectin is not necessary if the milk has calcium in it naturally or is calcium fortified. If your milk does not have calcium, we recommend adding 1 teaspoon of calcium water per cup of milk. Add the calcium water to the milk before you heat it. Stir well. Make the calcium water according to the directions that come with Pomona's Pectin (front side of recipe sheet, lower left corner).
  • When you have heated the milk to its hottest point, take a cup of the hot milk and put it in a cup for an immersion blender or in a food processor or blender.
  • Add the appropriate amount of pectin. We recommend using 1 teaspoon of pectin per 1 quart of lowfat or full fat animal milk. For non-fat animal milk, or non-animal milk, you may need up to 2 teaspoons of pectin per quart. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Run the machine for a good solid minute. Lift the lid and look for undissolved clumps of pectin stuck to the sides. Push any clumps onto the milk and run the machine until there are no undissolved clumps of pectin and the milk is perfectly smooth.
  • Add the pectinized milk to the rest of the milk and stir to get the pectin well distributed throughout all the milk.
  • Proceed with your yogurt recipe.

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12 Responses

  1. Marcia
    | Reply

    Can you use it to thicken yogurt that for some reason hasn’t firmed up properly (ie after the yogurt has already been made)? My yogurt usually sets, but on occasion it’s a bit runny. Would be very useful to use Pomona’s for those times.

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Thanks for your questions Marcia!

      We suppose you could try making a liquid pectin and mixing it into the unsolidified yogurt. You can find our guidelines for making a liquid pectin, below.

      You will be making liquid pectin using an immersion blender, food processor, or blender in order to add more pectin. Because your mixture is already too sweet to allow the pectin to dissolve, you must use boiling water or boiling unsweetened fruit juice.

      Use Table 3 below to determine the amount of water or unsweetened fruit juice you will use to blend the pectin into. See examples below the table.

      TABLE 3
      Pectin to Add Amount of boiling liquid
      Up to 3 teaspoons ½ cup liquid
      4 to 4 ¾ teaspoons ¾ cup liquid
      5 to 6 teaspoons 1 cup liquid
      7 teaspoons 1 ¼ cups liquid
      8 teaspoons 1 1/3 cups liquid
      Example 1: If you started with 4 cups of mashed peaches and your jam is not jelled at all, you need to add 3 teaspoons of pectin. This requires ½ cup boiling water or unsweetened fruit juice to make liquid pectin.

      Example 2: If you started with 8 cups of apple juice and had some jell in your jelly and determined you wanted to add 4 more teaspoons of pectin to get the jell you want, you would use ¾ cup boiling water or unsweetened fruit juice to make liquid pectin.

      Make liquid pectin by measuring the correct amount of water or unsweetened fruit juice into a small sauce pan and bring to a boil. Put boiling liquid in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

  2. Danielle Pearch
    | Reply

    I am attempting to make almond milk yogurt using Pomona’s pectin. What I am not clear about as far as using the pectin is where the calcium water comes into play. If Im using a tsp of pectin, how much of the calcium do I use? One recipe that I have (from Cultures For Health) says to use 1 tsp of pectin and calcium water but I don’t understand those directions. Any help you can give would be so wonderful!

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hello Danielle,
      Thanks so much for reaching out! Hope this helps to clarify for you…
      Before You Begin, prepare calcium water.
      To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

      Using the calcium powder that comes with Pomona’s Pectin is not necessary if the milk has calcium in it naturally or is calcium fortified.
      If your milk does not have calcium, we recommend adding 1 teaspoon of calcium water per cup of milk. Add the calcium water to the milk before you heat it. Stir well. Make the calcium water according to the directions that come with Pomona’s Pectin (front side of recipe sheet, lower left corner).

  3. Sandra
    | Reply

    When I followed the instructions of blending the pectin with 1 cup of the milk (almond milk) and then adding it to the rest of the milk. It doesn’t mix well and I was left with a chunky/watery yogurt. Is there a problem if I blend ALL the quart of almond milk with the pectin and calcium water?

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Hello Sandra,

      Thanks so much for reaching out! Did you heat the milk to its hottest point, then take a cup of the hot milk and put it in a cup for an immersion blender or in a food processor or blender and mix with the pectin until the pectin was dissolved?

  4. Larry
    | Reply

    Hooray and Hallelujah, my first attempt at homemade yogurt and I had great success. I added
    1 teaspoon of your pectin to the hot milk as instructed and it thickened beautifully. Thanks for the instructions. Larry

    • Shelby Collings
      | Reply

      Wonderful! Thank you for sharing with us Larry.

  5. sara
    | Reply

    Do you know if this will work with raw milk, only heating it to 110 degrees? Thanks!

    • Mary Lou Sumberg
      | Reply

      Dear Sara,

      It should be fine to dissolve the Pomona’s Pectin in 110 degree milk.

  6. Bets
    | Reply

    This is good to know. I’ve not made any homemade yogurt yet – simply because I’m trying to find Raw Cow or Goat Milk local – at least somewhere close to South Arkansas. But I have downloaded several recipes to make it and they all state that homemade can be runny.

    thank you.

    • JJ
      | Reply

      Bets, my home-made has mostly not been particularly runny as long as I heat to 190, then cool to 110. this cooks some of the protein and lets it thicken decently (it is also dependent on fat content and the type of culture you use! some are thicker than others)…but if you’re doing raw milk and want to keep it more raw in the yogurt state, you’d only be heating it to 110 degrees. That will come out more runny (kefir-esque in texture) though again it depends on the culture. don’t be afraid to let it set longer to thicken a bit more….. that said, if you can just add pomona’s to it and it is enough thickness – YAY!

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